Author: Diane Lee

Diane Lee is a fifty-something Australian author who quit her secure government job in 2016 because she was dying of boredom and wanted an adventure. Taking a risk and a volunteering job, she escaped to Hanoi, Vietnam and hasn’t regretted it. At all. Diane now works part-time for a social enterprise, and as freelance writer and editor. One day she hopes to marry a red-headed Irish or Scottish man named Stan.

I admire Maria Shriver. She’s had a tough year, but managed to stay dignified and gracious when her life was turned upside down by betrayal. I can empathise to a certain extent, because I was betrayed by The Italian; however, what Maria must have gone through can only be described as a personal hell, made worse because it was played out in the public domain. For a while there, her pain and misery sold many a tabloid newspaper and gossip magazine. Maria’s appeal – I think – is that she inspires others to live their lives with dignity, grace and

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We’ve all heard it: the “teamwork is great for business” and “we can achieve more together” mantras. And while I generally think this is true, this week, I’ve seen the negative side effect of teamwork: people going to work sick because they feel guilty for letting the side down. As regular readers are aware, I am very active on Twitter. And what I noticed this week was that a few people – all women – were tweeting they were going to work when they were sick, or at home working while sick. When I questioned these tweeters, it seemed that

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The original title for this post was 5 Things To Do Before I Die, but I decided against it. This post is about living and embracing life after all, not dying. Well, not yet anyway. So I came up with a new title, which is much more in keeping with the spirit of my intentions. So without further ado, here are 10 things I’d like to either do or achieve in the next 10 years. From where I sit, none of these things can not not be done. All that’s needed is a little chutzpah and a bit of luck.

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Last night, I spent the night with Dave Grohl from the Foo Fighters. So did a few thousand others, but that’s a minor detail. It was one of the best gigs I have ever been to (and I’ve been to a few over the years). I can honestly say that Dave gave 110% and then some. His performance was energetic, cheeky, personal and intimate. He gave the audience exactly what they wanted: himself. The ladies adored him and the men wanted to be him. He owned that stage. At one point, I said to my friends: “He looks like Jesus.”

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I went to university at age 26 because I thought having tertiary qualifications would mean that I would have better career opportunities. After all, that’s what all the rhetoric said, right? Before that I was worked in banks and took temp jobs to pay the bills. So I graduated from university, clutching my trusty Arts degree, thinking: “OK World, here I am! Come and get me!” And it did. It pulled me right back to banking and temp jobs. Hmmph. So much for better opportunities. Luckily, I became pregnant with my daughter and I realised I had to do something

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When my relationship with The Italian ended five years ago, I was in my early forties and my life as I knew it – and how I thought it was going to be – was over. I had put a lot of time, effort and energy into that relationship because I wanted it to work. I adored The Italian, and thought we would make a life together. Consequently, I made a huge investment in him and Us, and I put Me on hold. I lost friends because his family (which was large and extended) became my social circle. I made

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Bruce Campbell, for those of you who are blissfully unaware of such things, was an actor boy in 80s com-horror movies and other such capers. Among other things, he was Autolycus in Hercules in the 1990s, and is now in Burn Notice as ex-MarineNavy Seal, Sam Axe. To many, he is a cult hero. But this post is not about that. This post is about how @groovybruce has taken the boring celebrity tweet (and there are so many of them) and made his tweets engaging, interesting and relevant to other tweeters, and at the same time, built his brand. Bruce responds

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A psychological contract represents the mutual beliefs, perceptions, and informal obligations between an employer and an employee. It sets the dynamics for the relationship and defines the detailed practicality of the work to be done. – Wikipedia In my last post I explored how I am usually pro-change in my approach to work, and how, because of a restructure, I have become quite anti-change. While I was doing my Masters degree I read a research paper that said only 4% of corporate change management programs succeed. Or something like that. The point is: workplace change is difficult and this is

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It’s been a prolific month for me, writing-wise. And I have NaNoWriMo and NaNoBloPoMo to thank for it. I am glad I took part, because it made me realise how much I love – and missed – writing. Being able to write is a gift, and one I intend not to take for granted again. But I also learned a few things about me as a writer during this time. Writing for myself works for me I had the opportunity to write an article for a not-for-profit during November, and while I wrote a good article and made the deadline,

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I have always been someone who is comfortable with change. Generally, while others are protesting and digging their heels in (and I’m talking about work here), I’m the one rolling with the punches and just getting on with. I believe it’s a hangover from my dysfunctional childhood, where every time my mother married and divorced (and there were a number of marriages and divorces) my siblings and I had to move. Along with my mother, of course. The point is: I couldn’t fight it and there was no point trying, so acceptance of change became my default position. I have

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One of the best things about NaNoWriMo and NaNoBloPoMo is that I am blogging again. I am posting something new just about every day. But blogging scares the pants off me. It’s scary to put your writing out there on such an immediate (on so many levels) and global platform. Here’s why: What if I can’t find anything to write about? I am always worried – needlessly it seems – that I’ll run out of things to say.  I have readers and subscribers who expect me to write. And I expect me to write. What if I wake up one

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…and what makes you pull the covers over your head and hope it all goes away? When my relationship with The Italian ended after five years, I was devastated. Heartbroken doesn’t even begin to describe what I felt in the aftermath. I was left with nothing. I had no job, no friends, no life. I had to completely reinvent myself. And part of that process was (please don’t laugh) going to see a life coach. It was a process that was both confronting and enlightening. I discovered more about myself in those few months than I had in, well, forever.

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