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Tag: change management

How can you fix your organisational culture? It’s the age-old question that just about everyone asks at some point in their working lives: how do you fix a workplace culture that’s dysfunctional and toxic? The short answer is: you can’t. Sorry about that. The long answer is you can, but it takes a significant amount of energy, time and (probably) money. And in an age where most organisations want a quick fix, most organisational culture projects are doomed to failure because they are long tail. And these projects fail not because of systems, frameworks, project plans, policies, procedures, processes, guidelines or communication, although these all

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Sunday Best is a curated list of awesome articles I’ve read over the past week or so that I find enlightening, educational or just plain interesting. This week’s focus is not on stuff I’ve read, but on stuff I’ve written: my best posts for 2015—the ones that were the most read, and the ones that are my favourites. Enjoy! Most read posts Don’t make these 6 self publishing mistakes Published on August 7, this post about self publishing had close to 1000 views. Disillusioned, I wrote it after I didn’t become the overnight gazillionaire I thought I would once I embarked

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A psychological contract represents the mutual beliefs, perceptions, and informal obligations between an employer and an employee. It sets the dynamics for the relationship and defines the detailed practicality of the work to be done. – Wikipedia In my last post I explored how I am usually pro-change in my approach to work, and how, because of a restructure, I have become quite anti-change. While I was doing my Masters degree I read a research paper that said only 4% of corporate change management programs succeed. Or something like that. The point is: workplace change is difficult and this is

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I have always been someone who is comfortable with change. Generally, while others are protesting and digging their heels in (and I’m talking about work here), I’m the one rolling with the punches and just getting on with. I believe it’s a hangover from my dysfunctional childhood, where every time my mother married and divorced (and there were a number of marriages and divorces) my siblings and I had to move. Along with my mother, of course. The point is: I couldn’t fight it and there was no point trying, so acceptance of change became my default position. I have

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